Luminescent Noble Metal Nanoclusters as Optical Sensors

Focus Review: Luminescent Noble Metal Nanoclusters as an Emerging Optical Probe for Sensor Development

  • All bytes are used with permission from Chem Asian J, 2013, 8 (5), 858–871. DOI Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
  • Full size image links are available after clicking on the images below.

Using color images in Wiley journals such as Angew Chem Int Ed, Adv Mater, and Adv Funct Mater is quite costly. For this article published in Chem Asian J, we did not have the budget to pay for color images. As a result, all my “hand-colored” images were converted to grayscale (except the TOC graphic)…

It was very nice of the journal to send us a hard copy of the issue. I found the grayscale images actually looked very nice, especially the frontpiece. It would be hard to choose between the color and the grayscale ones if I had a choice.

All the graphics in this paper were designed using Adobe Photoshop, except the green shell of the nanocluster in Figure 1 and the scissors in Figure 12, which are designed using Adobe Illustrator. Photoshop is for creating Bitmap images, which are defined by the limited pixels they have, whereas Illustrator is for vector images. Conceptually speaking, vector images are defined by anchor points and rules associated with the points on a relative scale or coordinate, so they have the power of scalability, that is, they can be scaled freely and always look sharp. But they usually require more time and effort to create, so I use them scarcely.

The frontpiece compiles all the illustrations in the article with a Yin Yang symbol as the background. The Yin Yang symbol is also known as Yin Yang Fishes, it is an abstract drawing of a white fish with a black eye and a black fish with a white eye, and maybe they are swimming round and round. Okay, that’s enough history. During the drawing of the symbol, I was wrong about the ratio of the diameter of the fish heads (semicircle) to the diameter of fish eyes at first. So, what is the right ratio? ❓

Chem-Asian-J-2013-TOC

TOC graphic

Figure 1. Schematic illustration of the metal-core@ligand-shell structure of Au/Ag NCs and their physicochemical properties.

Chem-Asian-J-2013-Figure-7-BW

Figure 7. Schematic illustration of (a) “turn-off” and (b) “turn-on” detec- tion schemes.

Chem-Asian-J-2013-Figure-8-BW

Figure 8. Schematic illustration of the signal-generation mechanism of luminescent Au NC probes for Hg2+ detection based on the luminescence quenching by the metallophilic Hg2+(5d10)···Au+(5d10) interactions.

Figure 10. Schematic illustration of the signal-generation mechanism of luminescent Au NC probes for Ag+ detection based on luminescence enhancement by the deposition of Ag+ (or Ag0) on the NC surface.

Chem-Asian-J-2013-Figure-11-BW

Figure 11. Schematic illustration of the signal-generation mechanism of luminescent metal NC probes for the detection of some small ligands (etchants, e.g., thiolate, cyanide, and sulfide) based on luminescence quenching by analyte-induced metal core decomposition.

Figure 12. Schematic illustration of the signal-generation mechanism of luminescent metal NC probes for the detection of toxic ions (e.g., Hg2+, Pb2+, and Cd2+) based on luminescence quenching by ion-induced NC aggregation.

Figure 13. Schematic illustration of the signal-generation mechanism of luminescent metal NC probes for detection of biomolecules based on luminescence quenching induced by enzymatic catalysis.

And that’s all… Lots of illustrations for this article (-.-)Zzz

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